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Happy Fourth of July!

Tips to keep your pet safe on the Fourth of July

Before you throw another burger on the grill, please heed a few important tips to keep your pet safe this Fourth of July Holiday.  Many of the festivities that people enjoy, such as outdoor parties and fireworks, pose real hazards for your pet.

Help your pet beat the heat 

Dogs are particularly vulnerable to heat stroke and should never be left outside in the hot weather for extended periods. Even for animals accustomed to spending a lot of time outdoors, fireworks and other loud noises can startle them, and cause them to break free of their enclosure in an effort to find safety. Leave your pet in an escape-proof area of your home with plenty of good ventilation, fresh water, toys and even soothing music to drown out any loud outdoor activities. Dog Fourth of July

People food is…for people

You or your guests might think it’s cute when your pet begs for some holiday fixings, but many foods and all alcoholic beverages are poisonous to your pet. In severe cases, an animal can die from respiratory failure; even beer is toxic. Keep your pet on its normal diet, especially older animals that have more sensitive digestive systems.

Ditto on repellants

Bug sprays and sunscreens made for people are dangerous to pets, and can cause vomiting, diarrhea lethargy and even neurological issues. The same is true of citronella candles and insect coils, which release toxins when inhaled.

Yes, my name is Fido

Proper pet identification is always essential, but never more so than around holidays that carry a high risk for your dog or cat escaping the safety of your home. The standard is to microchip your pet for permanent identification, but at the very least make sure Fido and Fluffy are wearing secure pet collars with identification, including your contact information. Our partners at the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) have a free, universal pet microchip lookup for veterinarians and other pet professionals to check for a lost pet’s owner.

Don’t pimp out the pet

Glow jewelry and other holiday knickknacks/items might be fun for you and the kids, but they pose a hazard to your pet if swallowed. Tempting as it might be to deck out your dog in a neon glow necklace, a collar and ID tag are the only bling it really needs.

Many animal welfare organizations across the country report a sharp rise in lost pets after the Fourth of July. Not only does this overwhelm already overburdened shelters and municipal animal controls, but you risk not being reunited with your pet if you can’t be located in a timely manner. In some cases, this might be a death sentence for your beloved family pet.

Be kind to your dog or cat by following these simple guidelines to keep your pet safe, and have a wonderful Fourth of July!

Summer is here
& its HOT out there!


Here are some tips to keep your dog safe from the Heat

The summer months can be uncomfortable—even dangerous—for pets and people. It's difficult enough simply to cope with rising temperatures, let alone thick humidity, but things really get tough in areas that are hit with the double blow of intense heat and storm-caused power outages, sometimes with tragic results.

Never leave your pets in a parked car

Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

Watch the humidity

"It's important to remember that it's not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet," says Dr. Barry Kellogg, VMD, of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association. "Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly."

Taking a dog's temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Dogs' temperatures should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees.

Some signs of heatstroke are heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease. Some breeds of dogs—like boxers, pugs, shih-tzus, and other dogs and cats with short muzzles—will have a much harder time breathing in extreme heat.

How to treat a pet suffering from heatstroke

Move your pet into the shade or an air-conditioned area. Apply ice packs or cold towels to her head, neck, and chest or run cool (not cold) water over her. Let her drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. Take her directly to a veterinarian.

Limit exercise on hot day

Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

Don't rely on a fan

Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don't cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

Provide ample shade and water

Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don't obstruct air flow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

Cool your pet inside and out

Whip up a batch of quick and easy DIY peanut butter popsicles for dogs. (You can use peanut butter or another favorite food.) And always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you.

Keep your pet from overheating indoors or out with a cooling body wrap, vest, or mat (such as the Keep Cool Mat). Soak these products in cool water, and they'll stay cool (but usually dry) for up to three days. If your dog doesn't find baths stressful, see if she enjoys a cooling soak.

Prepare for power outages

Before a summer storm takes out the power in your home, create a disaster plan to keep your pets safe from heat stroke and other temperature-related trouble.


Kuranda Dog Beds
DOES YOUR PET NEED SHELTER? 
We're here to help!  Please fill out our Dog House Request Form & we'll get shelter, straw & anything else you may need for your pet, don't hesitate to ask!
Dog House
Request Form

If you need shelter for your dog, please fill out and submit form below and we'll get back to you as soon as possible!

First Name:
Last Name:
Address Street 1:
Address Street 2:
City:
Zip Code: (5 digits)
State:
Daytime Phone:
Evening Phone:
Email:
What Breed of Dog do you have?:
What size and weight is your dog?:
Does he/she have shelter now?:
Comments:

Troop 129 building dog houses for Dog Gone Rescue, thanks Scouts!! :)

Check out our Adoptable Pets!

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http://shelter.thundershirt.com/shelterDefault.aspx?sid=IA214

Adopt a Puppy


If you'd like to adopt a friend from Dog Gone Rescue, please contact us to arrange a time to meet the animal you are interested in and fill out our application. 
Our adoption Fee is:
Dogs: $100
Cat: $50
We look forward to meeting you!

 
All of our adoptable animals are heartworm tested, up-to-date on all vaccinations, including FIV & FeLk for cats.  State law also requires any animal adopted from Dog Gone Rescue be spayed or neutered within 90 days of adoption; however we strive to help control the pet population by trying to neuter and spay all of our animals before putting them up for adoption.  All our animals are also microchipped to help protect them should they get lost.


We've just recently started microchipping all of our pets as well to prevent them from ending up back in the shelters/pounds. 

We are a registered non-profit and rely solely on private donations.  The Adoption Fee will help us pay for many things: Vet expenses, food, kennels, dog houses, pet beds, leashes/collars, etc., basically items to keep them happy, healthy and comfortable until adopted.   

To apply to adopt an animal from Dog Gone Rescue, please print out our application, complete & email, fax or mail back, thanks!

WE'VE BEEN ADOPTED!!

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I'd like to thank everyone that has been putting money in our donation jars, mailing in personal donations, as well as donating food & wonderful pet items, such as toys, collar, leashes, pet beds, treats, even costumes!

It's absolutely wonderful to know I have such heartwarming and generous support to keep helping these animals...it really does make a difference, thank you so much!!!

If you'd like to help and would like to make a donation, please click the Donate button, or you can drop off or mail your donation to:



Dog Gone Rescue
c/o Janel McLain
205 S. Sumner Ave.
Creston, IA 50801

Items we need are: cash donations to help pay for vet expenses; donations of food, kennels, pet bedding, bowls, cat litter, cat boxes, toys, leashes, collars are always needed and appreciated. Anything we can use to meet the needs of the animals in our care, no matter how small, every lit bit helps!
THANK YOU!! :)

We also build dog houses for animals in need of shelter!
They are hand built out of wood, shingled, painted & straw provided if needed in the winter months.

These Dog Houses are FREE,
however any donation is welcome to help compensate for the expense of some of the supplies.

Don't hesitate to contact us if you are someone you know has a dog in need!
 
Donators: Akin Building Center, Mike Wolfe, Tony Allen,
Cindy Allen & Sterling Johns.

 
 
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